Arvada Center Blog

Young brains need theatre on the mind

Posted by Sarah Kolb on October 07th 2019 to Center News

Young brains need theatre on the mind

By Leslie Simon

You can learn a lot from a fairy tale! Experiencing live children’s theatre lets kids learn and explore important lessons that leave lasting impressions. Their curious minds become nourished with exciting new ideas and a better understanding of other cultures and the world around them.

All photos in this story courtesy Matt Gale Photography

At the Arvada Center, we are passionate about the positive effects that interacting with live arts have on young minds. We produce award-winning children’s theatre that engages thousands of children from the Denver metro area every year, including this fall’s production of Ella Enchanted and next spring’s take on the children’s classic The Velveteen Rabbit.

“Children’s theatre is so important for children to experience!  It not only exposes them to literature, music, art, dance and poetry, it also sparks their creative brain and, perhaps without realizing it, they learn life-lessons by watching conflict resolution,” says Arvada Center Director of Education Lisa Leafgreen. “Many young lives have been changed by that first moment when the lights dim, and they are transported into what imagination can do.”

Ella Enchanted

We get so many comments from people talking about the impact the Center has had on their lives- from parents whose children talk about plays they saw for months, even years afterward, to patrons who saw our children’s theatre productions through school field trips. We even have former students whose artistic interests were nurtured in our arts education classes now performing on our stages professionally.

Lessons learned from these plays and musicals imprint onto inquisitive minds and influence them into adulthood. Getting a glimpse into what goes on inside a character’s head helps children put themselves into another person’s shoes, nurturing understanding and empathy for other people and cultures.

In our current climate of social media echo chambers and biased news outlets, being able to see multiple sides of the story cultivates children who are better equipped to create lives filled with compassion and appreciation of others.

A research study performed by Brookings Institution showed that elementary school students who are exposed to live arts experiences were found to have an 8% increase in compassion and greater empathy for others, versus those who did not participate. Students who attended live children’s theatre were more interested in how other people feel, and more likely to want to help people who are treated badly- important traits for a caring community member to have.

Being in the audience of a children’s theatre performance also actively allows children to learn important lessons in etiquette and respect for those around them. Sitting through a theatre production lengthens short attention spans, and learning when to stay quiet and when to applaud gives young theatre patrons a chance to practice good manners and be an active participant in society. In a famous national study of 25,000 students, UCLA researchers found that students who were involved in the arts watched less television, participated in community service, and reported less boredom in school – behaviors that every parent and guardian can appreciate.

If you want to provide amazing live arts experience to your children or students, the Arvada Center has many opportunities for the theatrical exploration that kids need.

For more information on our programming including details about our upcoming children’s theatre productions of Ella Enchanted and The Velveteen Rabbit, visit our website: https://arvadacenter.org/pages/theatre-for-children-2019-2020.

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